Idd Ul Fitr
For Muslims, Idd-ul-fitr is a festival to show gratitude to Allah for the help and strength he gave them throughout the month of Ramadan to help them practice self-control.

Interior CS, Fred Matiangi, has gazetted, Friday, May 14 as a public holiday to mark Idd-ul-Fitr, a day when Muslims celebrate the end of the fasting month of Ramadhan.

The pomp and color will, however, be affected this year owing to various measures in place to curb the coronavirus pandemic, including the limiting of Idd prayers to a third of the capacity in Mosques, the ban on outdoor festivals where thousands gather among others.

Like the beginning of Ramadhan, Idd-ul-Fitr starts with the sighting of the crescent moon (a day after the new moon), so Muslims faithful have to wait until the evening before Idd to verify its date.

As the date of Idd depends on the sighting of the moon, there may be variations in the exact date that is celebrated around the world.

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‘Sawm’, which is the practice of fasting during the holy month of Ramadhan, is one of the five pillars of Islam.

Muslims believe that it was during the month of Ramadhan that the text of the Qur’an was revealed to the prophet Mohammad.

For Muslims, Idd-ul-fitr is a festival to show gratitude to Allah for the help and strength he gave them throughout the month of Ramadan to help them practice self-control.

Muslims celebrate Eid-ul-Fitr with prayers that are followed by a sermon, in which Imams ask for forgiveness, mercy and peace for every being across the world.

People congratulate one another after Idd prayers and spend the day visiting relatives and neighbours while accepting sweets as they move around their area of stay

Children, often in new outfits, are offered gifts to mark the joyous day.

This is preceded by the giving of alms to the less fortunate.

This public holiday is mainly celebrated by Muslims in Kenya but it is observed nationally.

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