A Muslim faithful prays at Jamia Mosque Nairobi. Photo | Courtesy.

Muslims faithful in Kenya started marking the Holy month of Ramadan on Tuesday, but a recent spike in coronavirus cases has once again put curbs on the season’s signature feasts and lengthy prayers in mosques.

The government recently rolled out tough new restrictions aimed at curbing the spread of Covid-19 in Kenya.

On a normal Friday evening, Muslim faithful would head to the mosques with family and friends to break the fast. Soon after, they would head home and share food with friends, family and relatives.

But this years’ Ramadan, just like last year, has been quite different with most of the mosques now closed and some offering virtual prayers via YouTube.

Muslim leaders had requested that the government to at the very least, reopen mosques and pushback curfew start time to allow them to conduct prayers during the holy month. The proposal was rejected.

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For many Muslims navigating restrictions, that meant hopes of a better Ramadan than last year have been dashed with the surge in infection rates though regulations vary in different countries.

In Egypt, mosques have been allowed to reopen for Friday communal prayers and this Ramadan it will let them hold taraweeh (additional virtual prayers performed by Muslims at night after the isha prayer during the holy month of Ramadan), also with precaution, including shortening its duration.

Of course our Muslim brothers and sisters miss the warmth of seeing people and spending time together but saving a human life is an obligation, you can’t put the life of a human in danger or at risk at all.

Muslim families are to share the spirit of the Holy month emotionally but keep recommended social distance to avoid the spread of Covid-19.

Ramadan Kareem to our Muslim brothers and sisters. 

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